High Fives

Moulana Integration programs

A successful integration and inclusion policy is an essential part of a well-managed and effective migration and asylum policy. It is also essential for social cohesion and for a dynamic economy that works for all. Any policies should be built on the principle that inclusive integration requires efforts from both the person and the host community.

If we want to help our societies and economies thrive, we need to support everyone who is part of society, with integration being both a right and a duty for all. This means empowering those facing disadvantages, while ensuring our communities are united and cohesive. It means giving equal opportunities to all to enjoy their rights and participate in community and social life, regardless of the background and in line with the  United Kingdom Social Rights.

The challenge of integration and inclusion is particularly relevant for refugees, Inclusion can and should be a win-win process, benefiting the entire society. But if integration and inclusion are to be successful, it must also be a two-way process whereby refugees are offered help to integrate and they in turn make an active effort to become integrated. The integration process involves the host society, which should create the opportunities for the  refugees full economic, social, cultural, and political participation. It also involves adaptation by refugees  who all have rights and responsibilities in relation to their new country of residence

Developing welcoming, diverse and inclusive societies is a process that needs the engagement of both refugees and the British society. Gaining an understanding of the laws, culture and values of the British society as early as possible, for example through civic orientation courses, is crucial for migrants to fully participate in the society

A more cohesive and inclusive society for all can also help prevent the spread of all forms of extremist ideologies that can lead to terrorism and violent extremism. Enhanced preventive actions can, in turn, address societal tensions and extremist ideologies and thus foster integration and peaceful coexistence among communities and individuals.

Newly arrived migrants often face a number of challenges when integrating into  UK  society, depending on how they arrived, their skills level, language knowledge and their background. Within each policy area, policymakers should design targeted and tailored support mechanisms to help newcomers quickly integrate.

In particular, migrant women and girls face additional obstacles to integration compared to migrant men and boys, often having to overcome structural barriers linked to their being both a migrant and female, including facing stereotypes. They are more likely to come to the UK to join a family member, bringing with them domestic responsibilities that can prevent them from fully participating in the labour market and in integration programs, skills assessments, re-training and other measures when these do not cater for such caring responsibilities. When employed, migrant women are more likely to be over-qualified for their jobs than native women.

This action plan sets out measures to step up action and to bring together actors at all levels in a common endeavour to achieve integration and inclusion and to ultimately build more cohesive and inclusive societies for all.

 

I. Education and training

 There are two realities with refugees:  They have done vocational training or learned a trade, are studying for a degree or have set up a business that employs people. They are helping Britain to grow and enriching her. Also another reality, they are here without integrating into society. They hardly speak any English or don’t want to and they don’t have a proper job supported mainly by state benefits   . A few of them are engaged in life of crime and deception. These insights into the two realities should help us in drawing plans to encourage one and reorient the latter.

 Education and training is the foundation for successful participation in society and one of the most powerful tools for building more inclusive societies

By teaching democracy, citizenship and critical thinking skills, schools play an important role in preventing young people from being attracted to violent extremist ideologies, organizations and movements.

Learning the language of the host country is crucial in order to successfully integrate. However, this should not stop a few months after arrival. Language classes should be supported also for intermediate and advanced courses and tailored to the needs of different groups. Combining language training with the development of other skills or work experience and with accompanying measures like childcare has proven to be particularly effective in improving access to and the outcome of language training. Finally, gaining an understanding of the laws, culture and values of the receiving society as early as possible, for example through civic orientation courses, is crucial for migrants to fully participate in the receiving society.

Actions supporting effective integration and inclusion in all sectoral areas

 

Integration is a societal process where the responsibility rests not with one particular group but rather with many: migrants, host communities, public authorities and institutions, social and economic partners, civil society organizations, churches, religious and other philosophical communities and the private sector. Empowering both migrants and host communities to actively engage in the integration process is essential to achieve sustainable and successful integration. 

 

Fostering participation and encounters with the host society 

Developing welcoming, diverse and inclusive societies is a process that needs the engagement of both migrants and the receiving society. Whether it is at school, the office, a sports club, or in the neighborhood, providing places and opportunities for refugees and local communities to meet and interact is a strong means for inclusion and more cohesive societies. Moreover, the promotion of intercultural dialogue, including interreligious dialogue between faith communities, is essential. Supporting refugees participation and interactions with the UK  society also requires providing opportunities for the local communities to learn more about people arriving in their communities and their backgrounds.

Moulana Will offer following programs: 

.   Moulana will carry out an assessment test before the integration course begins. The result will help the to determine with which stage of the course you should begin, and whether it would be useful for you to attend a special integration course. 

 

  • Start with a Friend The Start with a Friend initiative of Moulana  brings together  UK citizens and refugees. The tandem partners explore the city together, talk or learn English and help in dealing with the authorities.

  • Integration course for women

 Moulana will offer an integration course especially for women. Female refugees and migrants learn English in up to 960 lessons. The curriculum also covers knowledge of everyday life and insights into UK `s legal system, culture and history. In up to 1,000 lessons, the integration course for women brings your language skills up to a level that is good enough to take an active part in life in UK.

It also offers the following benefits:

  • They will get to know your children’s nursery or schools during the course.

  • Their course will be taught by a woman. 

  • They will meet other women with similar interests to yours.

  • The course will enable them to discuss subjects which particularly interest them. These might be for example bringing up and educating their children, and special advisory programs that are available in their area.

  • They will also learn about the differences and similarities between women’s lives in UK and those in their  own country.

  • The orientation course

 

They will attend the orientation course following on from the language course. It takes 100 lesson hours to complete, whilst the fast-track course version lasts 30 lesson units.

In the orientation course they will discuss the following, for example:

  • The  UK  legal system, history and culture,

  • Rights and obligations in UK ,

  • Forms of community life, and

  • Values that are important in UK, such as freedom of religion, tolerance and gender equality. 

 They will complete the orientation course by taking the "Life in UK” test 

Values and attitudes can also affect integration, both directly and indirectly. Different political values and attitudes toward the rule of law, as well as personal, family, and communal values, can create barriers between newcomers and  British . Moreover, values can be considered an integral part of ethnic identity, and a lack of host-country identity among newcomers in Europe has been found to hinder their labor market integration. Many refugees come from countries governed by dictators in which democratic traditions and civil-society structures have been weakly developed or destroyed in recent years.

Integration is a societal process where the responsibility rests not with one particular group but rather with many: migrants, host communities, public authorities and institutions, social and economic partners, civil society organizations, churches, religious and other philosophical communities and the private sector. Empowering both refugees and host communities to actively engage in the integration process is essential to achieve sustainable and successful integration.

 

We Talk  APP.

 An app will be launched whereby students of Arabic , Persian languages    a can have internet based conversation with native speaker and pick up  colloquial subtleties of language.